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Two 'Flyable' Cold War Fighter Jets Are up for Auction

Two 'Flyable' Cold War Fighter Jets Are up for Auction

If you've ever wanted to have your own Cold War fighter jet, you are in luck today. Some of the most versatile warbirds of that era up for auction, and you can actually a historic relic for the cost of a used car.

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The heartthrobs that are up for auction are the two F-100F Super Sabre fighter jets. The listing of the warbirds is up on Mojave Air & Space Port in Mojave, California.

They will cost you as much as a decent used car, which is interesting to think about since these warbirds carried nuclear bombs amid the Vietnam War and are historic relics that almost belong to a museum.

They do have a long history indeed. To give you an idea of the F-100, it was the first U.S. fighter that was able to fly at supersonic speed. They were born in the U.S. with the goal of taking their place in the U.S. Air Force. They were given the names, as in tail numbers, N417FS and N418FS. Afterward, they were transferred to the Royal Danish Air Force where they wouldn't remain long. In 1983, they were flown to the U.K. and owned privately, Popular Mechanics reports.

Apparently, one of the jets, F418FS, had a little accident when the aircraft ran into a ditch after failing to slow down while landing in July 1989, with pilot not injured. After that, they were registered to Big Sky Warbirds in Montana in the 2000s and they were last used as radar targets at Tracor Flight Systems.

They are both in good condition, according to the listing on Proxibid. While N417FS reportedly has damaged tail and front landing gear, both jets are reported to be "flyable".

Retired from military service and most recently used as an experimental aircraft, these two-seaters are looking for their new history-lover owners that will take them up to the skies or will exhibit them for everyone to see.


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